Laurence C. Windell  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.1, Petra Pokorná This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.1, Jaroslav Schwarz1, Petr Vodička1, Philip K. Hopke2, Naděžda Zíková  1, Radek Lhotka1, Jakub Ondráček1, Petr Roztočil1, Michal Vojtišek1, Vladimír Ždímal1 

1 Aerosol Chemistry and Physics Research Group, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, 165 00, Czech Republic
2 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, 14642, New York, USA


Received: February 26, 2024
Revised: April 29, 2024
Accepted: April 29, 2024

 Copyright The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are cited.


Download Citation: ||https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.240058  


Cite this article:

Windell, L.C., Pokorná, P., Schwarz, J., Vodička, P., Hopke, P.K., Zíková, N., Lhotka, R., Ondráček, J., Roztočil, P., Vojtišek, M., Ždímal, V. (2024). Highly Time-Resolved Elemental Source Apportionment at a Prague Urban Traffic Site. Aerosol Air Qual. Res. 24, 240058. https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.240058


HIGHLIGHTS

  • Source apportionment revealed domestic heating as the dominant PM2.5 factor.
  • Traffic contributed 13% to total emissions at the traffic site.
  • Long-range emissions from coal-burning plants were observed, especially in winter.
 

ABSTRACT


Positive Matrix Factorization was used for source apportionment of 2-hour online metals (Xact625i; PM2.5) and elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC analyser; PM1) data at an urban traffic site in Prague, Czech Republic, for two month-long periods in spring (February–March) and winter (November–December), 2020 (400 samples). Five factors were obtained for spring: Local heating (39%), Soil/road dust (21%), Secondary inorganic aerosol (20%), Traffic (12%), and Road salt (9%), while four factors were resolved for winter: Local heating (20%), Soil/road dust (31%), Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA; 36%), and Traffic (13%). Aside from SIA, the sources were of local origins. Air mass back trajectories calculated by HYSPLIT and concentration weighted trajectories (CWT) were used to identify long-distance sources. Greater PM concentrations during winter (~3 times greater) were attributed to both lower boundary layer heights and more abundant air masses from Central Europe, compared to more marine air masses during spring.


Keywords: PMF, Online, Xact, EC/OC




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