Jian-He Lu1, Ming-Hsien Tsai2, Sen-Ting Huang3,4, Jia-De Lee3, Ta-Chih Hsiao  5,6, Wan Nurdiyana Wan Mansor7,8, How-Ran Chao This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.1,3,9,10 

1 Emerging Compounds Research Center, General Research Service Center, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
2 Department of Child Care, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
3 Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital Pingtung Branch, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
5 Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
6 Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan
7 Faculty of Ocean Engineering Technology & Informatics, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21300, Malaysia
8 Air Quality and Environment Research Group, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21300, K. Nerus, Malaysia
9 Institute of Food Safety Management, College of Agriculture, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
10 School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan


Received: September 30, 2022
Revised: November 28, 2022
Accepted: December 16, 2022

 Copyright The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are cited.


Download Citation: ||https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.220340  

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Cite this article:

Lu, J.H., Tsai, M.H., Huang, S.T., Lee, J.D., Hsiao, T.C., Wan Mansor, W.N., Chao, H.R. (2023). Traffic-related-air-pollutant PM2.5 Caused Toxicity on Caenorhabditis elegans with Cotreatment of High-dose Glucose and Tempeh. Aerosol Air Qual. Res. 23, 220340. https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.220340


HIGHLIGHTS

  • Traffic-related-air-pollutant (TRAP) PM2.5 reduced the brood size and shortened the longevity of nematodes.
  • TRAP PM2.5 exposure delayed growth and locomotion behavior in nematodes.
  • TRAP PM2.5 exposure altered the antioxidant gene expression in nematodes.
  • High-glucose co-treatment enhanced adverse effects of TRAP PM2.5 in nematodes.
  • Tempeh ameliorates adverse effects induced by TRAP PM2.5 and high-glucose diet.
 

ABSTRACT


Rapid economic development and urbanization have significantly increased PM2.5-induced and hyperglycemia-induced toxicological effects. Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian food and may be beneficial for patients with type II diabetes. However, the toxicological effects of co-exposure to traffic-related-air-pollutant (TRAP) PM2.5 with high glucose and the potential therapeutic effect of tempeh remain unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an in vivo animal model, we found that exposure to 12.74 mg L–1 TRAP PM2.5 and 80 mM D-glucose could induce toxicity in nematodes that affects growth, reproduction, locomotion behavior, and lifespan. Moreover, TRAP PM2.5 and high glucose diet co-treatment reinforced these adverse effects on C. elegans. However, pretreatment with 200 µg of tempeh extract had the greatest improvement in the adverse effects of treatment with or without 12.74 mg L–1 TRAP PM2.5 and with or without 80 mM D-glucose on C. elegans. In addition, tempeh treatment also ameliorated the altered mRNA expression of the antioxidant gene in C. elegans treated with or without TRAP PM2.5 and with or without high-dose glucose diets. These findings reveal that co-exposure to TRAP PM2.5 and high-dose glucose causes more serious health effects, while tempeh could modulate oxidative stress which ameliorated TRAP PM2.5-induced and hyperglycemia-induced toxicological effects.


Keywords: Particulate matter, High-dose glucose, Tempeh, Caenorhabditis elegans




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