Dongho Shin1,2, Younghun Kim1,2, Kee-Jung Hong1, Gunhee Lee1, Inyong Park1, Hak-Joon Kim1, Yong-Jin Kim1, Bangwoo Han This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.1, Jungho Hwang This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.2 

1 Department of Environment Machinery, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials, Daejeon 34103, Korea
2 Mechanical engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea


Received: December 10, 2021
Revised: December 10, 2021
Accepted: January 6, 2022

 Copyright The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are cited.


Download Citation: ||https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.210378  

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Cite this article:

Shin, D., Kim, Y., Hong, K.J., Lee, G., Park, I., Kim, H.J., Kim, Y.J., Han, B., Hwang, J. (2022). Measurement and Analysis of PM10 and PM2.5 from Chimneys of Coal-fired Power Plants Using a Light Scattering Method. Aerosol Air Qual. Res. 22, 210378. https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.210378


HIGHLIGHTS

  • Fine particle measurements were performed on six coal-fired power plants in Korea.
  • All stacks showed bimodal distribution, and the CMDs were 0.5 µm and 1.1 µm.
  • PM10 increased depending on the amount of power generated.
 

ABSTRACT


Aerial pollutants emitted from the stacks of coal-fired power plants are considered a major source of fine particulate matter released into the atmosphere. To manage such fine particles in the stacks themselves, it is necessary to know the concentration of fine particles emitted in real time; the current system to do so is tedious. In this study, a system for measuring fine particles emitted from the stacks of power plants in real-time was developed, and measurements were performed on six coal-fired power plants. Through these measurements, the mass concentration distribution, according to particle sizes, could be determined. All six stacks showed bimodal distribution, and the count median diameters of each mode were 0.5 µm and 1.1 µm. Additionally, data were compared using the gravimetric measurement method; it was found that the relative accuracies for the measured PM10 amounts were within 20% and that the values obtained using the measuring instrument proposed in this study were reliable. Three power plants were continuously measured for one month, and by comparing PM10 concentration according to the amount of power generated, it was confirmed that PM10 discharged from the stack increased as an exponential function, depending on the amount of power generated.


Keywords: Dilutor, Optical particle counter, Coal-fired power plant, Power generation, PM10




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