Yen-Yi Lee1,2,5, Chung-Shin Yuan This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.3,4, Po-Hsuan Yen3, Justus Kavita Mutuku This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.1,2,6, Chien-Er Huang1,2,7, Chih-Cheng Wu8, Po-Jen Huang8

1 Super micro mass research and technology center, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung 833301, Taiwan
2 Center for Environmental Toxin and Emerging-Contaminant Research, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung 833301, Taiwan
3 Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan
4 Aerosol Research Center, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan
5 Department of Food and Beverage Management, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung 833301, Taiwan
6 Institute of Environmental Toxin and Emerging Contaminant, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung 833301, Taiwan
7 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung 833301, Taiwan
8 Environmental Bioengineering and Chemical Analysis Section, New Materials Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan


Received: November 19, 2021
Revised: January 7, 2022
Accepted: January 10, 2022

 Copyright The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are cited.


Download Citation: ||https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.210320  

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Cite this article:

Lee, Y.Y., Yuan, C.S., Yen, P.H., Mutuku, J.K., Huang, C.E., Wu, C.C., Huang, P.J. (2022). Suppression Efficiency for Dust from an Iron Ore Pile Using a Conventional Sprinkler and a Water Mist Generator. 22, 210320. Aerosol Air Qual. Res. https://doi.org/10.4209/aaqr.210320


HIGHLIGHTS

  • Wind velocities related linearly with resuspended PM concentrations.
  • Low wind velocity and intermittent water supply had the highest PM suppression rate.
  • Surfactant raised both the water’s wetting ability and PM suppression efficiency.
  • Mist generator and sprinkler worked best at low and high angle of spray, respectively.
 

ABSTRACT


Re-suspension of iron ore dust presents a constant hazard in the working environment within steel production plants. Herein, the optimal operating parameters for maximum dust suppression efficiencies through a water mist generator and a conventional sprinkler for particulate matter (PM) originating from an iron ore pile measuring about 2 m in height and with a stacking angle of about 30° are investigated. The effects of operating parameters including wind velocity, spray angle, and mode of water supply on dust suppression efficiencies are evaluated. Size differentiated PM samples were collected from the upwind and downwind locations of the iron oral pile and the dust suppression efficiencies are determined. The operating parameters with the highest dust suppression efficiencies using the water mist technology are low spray angle, low wind velocity, and intermittent water supply, while those for water sprinkling technology are high spray angle, low wind velocity, and intermittent water supply. The average dust suppression efficiencies for Total Suspended Particles (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5 for the mist generators are 80.9%, 77.9%, and 76.9%, respectively, whereas those for the conventional sprinklers are 76.4%, 72.9%, and 72.7%, respectively. For the surfactant to water ratios of 0.024, 0.022 and no surfactant, the ratio of 0.024 had the highest dust suppression efficiencies for TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 at 90.9%, 89.5%, and 89.0%, respectively. Insights from this investigation can be applied to optimize the dust suppression methods to ensure economical consumption of water and energy.


Keywords: Iron ore pile, Particulate matter, Water mist generator and conventional sprinkler, Surfactant, Dust suppression efficiency




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