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Influence of Cloud/Fog on Atmospheric VOCs in the Free Troposphere: A Case Study at Mount Tai in Eastern China

Category: Aerosol and Atmospheric Chemistry

Article In Press
DOI: 10.4209/aaqr.2016.12.0536
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Fengchun Yang1, Yan Wang 1, Hongli Li 2, Minmin Yang1, Tao Li1, Fangfang Cao2, Jianmin Chen3, Zhe Wang4

  • 1 School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100, China
  • 2 Environmental Monitoring Central Station of Shandong Province, Jinan, Shandong 250100, China
  • 3 Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100, China
  • 4 Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China

Highlights

Cloud/fog conditions have an impact on characteristic of atmospheric VOCs.
OVOCs and halocarbons were the dominant VOCs.
The atmospheric VOCs were higher on cloudy/foggy days except for


Abstract

Field measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were conducted in July of 2015 at Mount Tai, where 63 species of VOCs were measured using GC-MS. In this study, air samples were collected in two different weather conditions: cloud/fog and non-cloud/fog respectively and influences of the cloud/fog on VOCs species were analyzed. The sources of air masses were calculated by back trajectories with HYSPLIT model. Five main kinds of VOCs were analyzed and oxy-VOCs (OVOCs) had the largest contribution (67% on the cloudy/foggy days and 72% on the non-cloudy/foggy days) to total measured VOCs among all of the samples collected at Mount Tai. Acetone was the most abundant compound (18 ppb on the cloudy/foggy days and 15 ppb on the non-cloudy/foggy days) among the VOCs. The concentrations of VOCs collected in cloudy/foggy days were higher than those measured in non-cloudy/foggy days and indicated that cloudy/foggy days favoured the accumulation of atmospheric VOCs. However, the concentrations of most OVOCs in non-cloud/fog conditions were higher than those in cloud/fog conditions. Atmospheric photochemical reactions may partly account for this result. Air mass trajectory analysis shows that most air masses from heavily polluted areas results in the increase of atmospheric VOCs. OVOCs and aromatics provided the main contribution to ozone formation potential. Besides cloud and fog, VOC concentration is concerned with integrated factors including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction.

Keywords

Atmospheric VOCs Mount Tai Cloud Fog Photochemical reactions


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