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Small-Scale Study of Siberian Biomass Burning: II. Smoke Hygroscopicity

Category: Aerosol and Atmospheric Chemistry

Volume: 16 | Issue: 7 | Pages: 1558-1568
DOI: 10.4209/aaqr.2015.11.0648
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Olga B. Popovicheva 1, Natalia M. Persiantseva1, Mikhail A. Timofeev1, Natalia K. Shonija2, Valerii S. Kozlov3

  • 1 Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, 119991, Moscow, Russia
  • 2 Chemical Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, 119991, Moscow, Russia
  • 3 Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, Zuev sq.1, 634021, Tomsk, Russia

Highlights

Fractionation of smoke particles of Siberian biomass burning in small scale fires.
Quantification of pine and debris smoke hygroscopicity at microscopic level.
Separation of fresh and aged particles on hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and hygroscopic.


Abstract

A lack of understanding about the impact of Siberian wildfire emissions on the environment necessitates the characterization of biomass burning aerosol hygroscopicity. Flaming fires of typical Siberian biomass (pine and debris) were simulated during small-scale combustion experiments in a Large Aerosol Chamber (LAC). Analyses of individual particles with respect to morphology and elemental composition allows the separation of freshly-produced smoke into five fractions with the elemental carbon, chain soot agglomerates, irregular internally mixed soot, and distinct irregular minerals of fly ash containing S, Ca, Al, and Si. Aging in a dark chamber leads to an appearance of the fraction with inorganic inclusions such as KCl and CaCl2. Categorization of fresh-emitted and aged particles on hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and hygroscopic ones is performed. The criteria for categorization are extended from fossil fuel high-temperature combustion, based on a concept of water uptake by soot particles and utilization of a number of reference soots with known oxygen content and mixtures with sulfates and other inorganic salts. We show how the hydration properties of emitted smoke particles and inorganic inclusions can increase the initial level of smoke hygroscopicity.

Keywords

Biomass burning Siberian wildfires Smoke aerosol Elemental composition Fractionation Water absorption Hygroscopicity


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